Office of Inspector General (OIG)

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How was the OIG Formed?
The OIG was created by County ordinance to promote economy, efficiency and effectiveness in the administration of and, as its priority to prevent and detect fraud and abuse in programs and operations administered or financed by the County. It was determined that the oversight of such a large and diverse government required the organization and administration of the OIG to be independent and autonomous, to assure that no interference or influence external to the OIG adversely affects the independence and objectivity of the Inspector General. The OIG's jurisdiction has since grown to include the Solid Waste Authority, Health Care District, Children's Services Council and all thirty-eight municipalities. The Inspector General serves a four year term and future Inspector Generals will be selected by the Inspector General Committee which is comprised of the Commission on Ethics, the State Attorney and the Public Defender.
What is the Function of the OIG?
The OIG has the authority to make investigations of LGEA matters and the power to review and audit past, present and proposed LGEA programs, accounts, records, contracts, change orders and transactions. In order to carry out this function, the OIG has the power to subpoena witnesses and require the production of documents, records and other information. Furthermore, the OIG is authorized to conduct random audits, inspections, and reviews on any LGEA contract. The OIG initiates, conducts, supervises and coordinates activities designed to detect, deter, prevent and eradicate fraud, waste, mismanagement, misconduct, and other abuses by elected and appointed LGEA officials and employees, LGEA agencies and instrumentalities, contractors, their sub-contractors and lower tier sub-contractors and other parties doing business with a LGEA and/or receiving LGEA funds.
What is LGEA?
LGEA is an acronym for all Local Governmental Entities Authorized by Ordinance, Charter, County Code or interlocal agreements to fall within the OIG’s jurisdiction. The OIG’s initial jurisdiction was County government pursuant to Board of County Commissioner adopted Ordinance 2009-049. On November 1, 2010 an interlocal agreement was approved to expand jurisdiction over the Solid Waste Authority. In the November 2010 election voters approved OIG jurisdiction over all thirty-eight municipalities, effective June 1, 2011. On January 1, 2012 the Palm Beach County Health Care District and Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County voluntarily entered into agreement for provision of OIG services.
What is the Jurisdiction of the OIG?
The Palm Beach County OIG's jurisdiction encompasses all departments, agencies, instrumentalities, and programs of each LGEA. This jurisdiction extends to all LGEA employees, public officials, and elected officials. The OIG also has jurisdiction over vendors, contractors, their sub-contractors and lower tier sub-contractors doing business with any LGEA.
What are the Powers Available to the OIG?
According to the OIG's enabling legislation, the Office shall have the power to require production of documents from and receive full and unrestricted access to the records of the LGEA Board, LGEA Administrator, all elected and appointed LGEA officials and employees, LGEA departments, divisions, agencies and instrumentalities, contractors, their sub-contractors and lower tier sub-contractors and other persons and entities doing business with the LGEA and/or receiving LGEA funds. The Inspector General's jurisdiction includes but shall not be limited to all projects, programs, contracts or transactions that are funded in whole or in part by the LGEA.
Conversely, the OIG may report to these same individuals its findings and recommendations arising from an investigation, audit, or review. Unless otherwise exempt from public disclosure, these findings and recommendations are released in a public report and can be found at:
http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/reports.htm
Is the Office of the Inspector General a Law Enforcement Agency?
No. The OIG is not a law enforcement agency. As such, our agents do not have the authority to arrest individuals. The OIG works in conjunction with law enforcement agencies, the Office of the State Attorney, 15th Judicial Circuit, and the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida with respect to pursuing criminal investigations.
Does the OIG Have Subpoena Power?
Yes, although most often, the OIG is able to acquire the same information and/or obtain the same documentation using mechanisms already available to us through our enabling ordinance, contract language, and other legally binding agreements. In rare cases when a subpoena is necessary, the OIG provides written notice seventy-two (72) hours prior to serving the subpoena to both the Office of the State Attorney, 15th Judicial Circuit and the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida to insure that the issuance of our subpoena will not interfere with an on-going criminal investigation. OIG subpoenas are enforceable through the 15th Judicial Circuit Court.
What Mandatory Obligations Are Placed Upon the Inspector General?
Where the Inspector General suspects a possible violation of any state, federal or local law or rule, regulation or policy, the IG shall notify the appropriate civil, criminal or administrative agencies. The OIG shall publish an annual report that can be found at: http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/reports.htm
How Do I Report Fraud, Waste or Abuse Without Losing My Job as a County, Municipal or SWA Employee?
Each report of fraud, waste or abuse is reviewed for whistle-blower protection. If you believe that making a report to the OIG will place you at risk of retaliation, you should inform the OIG of this fact. If you are granted whistle-blower protection, your name and identity will be protected from disclosure (112.3188, Florida Statutes).
When Does the OIG Initiate an Investigation?
Each report of fraud, waste or abuse is reviewed by the Intake Unit within the OIG. Investigations are initiated upon receipt of information alleging an act of fraud, waste, financial mismanagement, misconduct, corruption or other abuses within the OIG's jurisdiction.
When are Reports of Investigations Made Available to the Public?
Once the OIG closes an investigation or audit, the reports are redacted (confidential information such as social security number, personal health information are removed) and posted on the OIG's website under Reports.  
When Should I Contact the OIG?
You should contact the OIG whenever you have reason to suspect fraud, waste, mismanagement, misconduct, or other abuses within or relating to the LGEA. Employees of each LGEA should refer to their LGEA Policy that outlines their responsibilities for reporting such information. The OIG's main telephone number is (561) 233-2350.
What Happens If the OIG Does Not Have Jurisdiction Over a Matter?
You will be notified of this fact, and whenever possible, we will refer your report of fraud, waste or abuse to the appropriate agency or organization that can provide assistance.
How Do I Report Acts of Fraud, Waste, Mismanagement, Misconduct, or other Abuses to the OIG?
You may report this information to us in one of four ways;
1) You may report your concerns to us by email, US Mail, or fax in a written complaint;
2) You can stop by our office and meet with an OIG Intake Specialist and provide the information directly to us;
3) You may call our hotline at 877-283-7068; or
4) You can access our secure email (inspector@pbcgov.org) via this website to provide us with the information. In any event, you may remain anonymous; however, you are encouraged to identify yourself so that we may follow up on your call or email and obtain additional information that would help us in an our investigation.

Forms to report fraud, waste or abuse: http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/complaints.htm or
Email a report of fraud, waste or abuse to inspector@pbcgov.org or
Fax a report of fraud, waste or abuse to: (561) 233-2375 or
Mail report to:
Office of Inspector General
Investigations Section
P.O. Box 16568
West Palm Beach, FL 33416

To speak with an Investigator, Auditor or Contract Specialist in the OIG, please call (561) 233-2350.
Our office is located at:
Office of Inspector General
Airport Center
100 Australian Avenue, 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33406



Audit Division

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What is the function of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) Audit Division?
The OIG Audit Division is an independent, objective assurance and consulting component designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by providing a systematic, disciplined approach to the evaluation of risk, inefficiencies, control, and governance processes.
What does the OIG Audit Division do?
The OIG Audit Division evaluates effectiveness and program compliance within a LGEA Government. It also provides analyses, research and recommendations to ensure accountability. LGEA is an acronym for Local Governmental Entities within the OIG's jurisdiction, Authorized by Ordinance, Charter, County Code or interlocal agreement.
What is LGEA?
LGEA is an acronym for all Local Governmental Entities Authorized by Ordinance, Charter, County Code or interlocal agreements to fall within the OIG’s jurisdiction. The OIG’s initial jurisdiction was County government pursuant to Board of County Commissioner adopted Ordinance 2009-049. On November 1, 2010 an interlocal agreement was approved to expand jurisdiction over the Solid Waste Authority. In the November 2010 election voters approved OIG jurisdiction over all thirty-eight municipalities, effective June 1, 2011. On January 1, 2012 the Palm Beach County Health Care District and Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County voluntarily entered into agreement for provision of OIG services.
What are internal controls?
Internal controls are policies and procedures designed to minimize risks and provide reasonable assurance regarding the achievement of objectives in the following internal control categories:
Effectiveness and efficiency of operations
Reliability of financial reporting
Compliance with laws, rules and regulations.
Examples of internal controls include segregation of duties, authorization of transactions, documentation to support transactions and safeguarding Information Technology resources and assets.
Under what authority are audits conducted?
Article XII of the Palm Beach County Code, governs the OIG and establishes the OIG as the independent oversight of LGEA operations which promote economy, efficiency and effectiveness in government. Audits are conducted in accordance with the current International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing as published by the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc. , or when appropriate, in accordance with Generally Accepted Governmental Auditing Standards.
What types of issues do audits address?
Audits are conducted to make sure adequate records are maintained; funds are properly spent and amounts are properly recorded; internal controls are in place to include security and appropriate levels of accountability and oversight; and programs are designed and carried out to effectively and efficiently achieve desired outcomes.
How are audits and other projects selected?
The OIG Director of Audit coordinates the development of an annual Audit Plan. The process identifies the audit universe and selects topics using risk assessment criteria. These topics are included in the plan and scheduled for audit, based on risk prioritization methodology and audit resources. The OIG Audit Section does not duplicate valid audit work performed by the Audit Department of a LGEA.
What are risk assessment criteria?
Risk assessment criteria include, prior audit or investigative findings, complaint history, fraud risk, and audit staff feedback.
What are the steps used in conducting an audit project.
The audit process involves planning the audit, conducting fieldwork to include interviews and writing the report. Before a final audit report is issued, an exit conference is convened to discuss the draft report with program management. After the exit conference, a preliminary report is provided to management, which has 20 calendar days to submit a written response. Those affected by the audit, pursuant to Article XII, Section 2-427 of the Palm Beach County Code, are also provided an opportunity to respond to the preliminary audit. The final report includes the response received from management and, if applicable, the substantially affected.
Does the Audit Division provide services other than audits?
The OIG Audit Division provides a variety of services. In addition to audits, staff reviews performance measures to determine if measured data reporting is reliable and valid. Other projects may include organizational assessments, customer satisfaction surveys, reviews, investigation support, research, and management consulting services. The OIG Audit Section also conducts follow-up reviews on the progress of all recommendations made.
How am I notified if my program, contract or grant is going to be audited by the OIG Audit Division?
When an audit or review is initiated, the OIG Audit Division notifies the subject or client of the audit with an interoffice memorandum (internal subjects) or a letter (external subjects). OIG Audit staff may also meet with the subject or client to discuss the scope and objectives of the audit or review.
How will I know what the auditors find during the audit?
Prior to the end of fieldwork, the OIG Audit staff will discuss the tentative findings with management responsible for the area being audited. Sometimes the client has additional information that could change the auditor's perception of a tentative finding. Questions regarding tentative findings can be resolved through this process. For issues that remain unresolved, the auditor will prepare a draft report of the audit findings. A formal exit conference will be held to discuss accuracy and content of the draft report.
How can I get more information about the audit process?
There is a PowerPoint presentation in narrative form available on our website.
Go to: http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/audit.htm
How do I report fraudulent activity?
You may report this information to us in one of four ways; 1) You may report your concerns to us by email, US Mail, or fax in a written complaint; 2) You can stop by our office and meet with an OIG Intake Specialist and provide the information directly to us; 3) You may call our hotline at 877-283-7068; or 4) You can access our secure email (inspector@pbcgov.org) via this website to provide us with the information. In any event, you may remain anonymous; however, you are encouraged to identify yourself so that we may follow up on your call or email and obtain additional information that would help us in an our investigation. Below is a link to the section's reporting form, which is recommended but not required.

Forms to report fraud, waste or abuse: http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/complaints.htm or
Email a report of fraud, waste or abuse to inspector@pbcgov.org or
Fax a report of fraud, waste or abuse to: (561) 233-2375 or
Mail report to:
Office of Inspector General
Investigations Division
P.O. Box 16568
West Palm Beach, FL 33416

To speak with an Auditor or the Intake Manager in the OIG Investigations Division, please call (561) 233-2350.
Our office is located at:
Office of Inspector General
Airport Center
100 Australian Avenue, 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33406



Contract Oversight Division

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What is the function of the OIG Contract Oversight Division?
The OIG Contract Oversight Division provides oversight of LGEA procurement process from the initial requirement stage through contract award to ensure LGEA procurement activities are conducted in accordance with applicable laws, ordinances, policies, regulations, and processes. LGEA is an acronym for all Local Governmental Entities Authorized by Ordinance, Charter, County Code or interlocal agreement to fall within the OIG's jurisdiction.
What is LGEA?
LGEA is an acronym for all Local Governmental Entities Authorized by Ordinance, Charter, County Code or interlocal agreements to fall within the OIG’s jurisdiction. The OIG’s initial jurisdiction was County government pursuant to Board of County Commissioner adopted Ordinance 2009-049. On November 1, 2010 an interlocal agreement was approved to expand jurisdiction over the Solid Waste Authority. In the November 2010 election voters approved OIG jurisdiction over all thirty-eight municipalities, effective June 1, 2011. On January 1, 2012 the Palm Beach County Health Care District and Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County voluntarily entered into agreement for provision of OIG services.
What does the OIG Contract Oversight Division do?
The OIG Contract Oversight Division attends contract selection committee meetings; tracks contract awards, vendors, and dollar values; assesses contract risks; monitors high risk contracts throughout the life of the contract; and monitors cost, schedule and performance of the contract.   Also, the Contract Oversight Division monitors vendors and LGEA offices charged with contract monitoring through observations and inspections.
What are the requirements for notification of any selection committee to the OIG?
The OIG must be notified in writing prior to any meeting of a selection committee where any matter relating to the procurement of goods or services by the LGEA is to be discussed. Such notice should be given to the OIG as soon as possible after a meeting has been scheduled.
How do I report fraudulent activity?
You may report this information to us in one of four ways; 1) You may report your concerns to us by email, US Mail, or fax in a written complaint; 2) You can stop by our office and meet with an OIG Intake Specialist and provide the information directly to us; 3) You may call our hotline at 877-283-7068; or 4) You can access our secure email (inspector@pbcgov.org) via this website to provide us with the information. In any event, you may remain anonymous; however, you are encouraged to identify yourself so that we may follow up on your call or email and obtain additional information that would help us in an our investigation. Below is a link to the 's reporting form, which is recommended but not required.

Forms to report fraud, waste or abuse: http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/complaints.htm or
Email a report of fraud, waste or abuse to inspector@pbcgov.org or
Fax a report of fraud, waste or abuse to: (561) 233-2375 or
Mail report to:
Office of Inspector General
Investigations Division
P.O. Box 16568
West Palm Beach, FL 33416

To speak with a Contract Specialist or the Intake Manager in the OIG Investigations Division, please call: (561) 233-2350.
Our office is located at:
Office of Inspector General
Airport Center
100 Australian Avenue, 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33406



Investigations Division

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What is the Inspector General Investigations Division and what does it do?
The Inspector General Investigations Division is part of the Office of Inspector General (OIG). It consists of an intake division and investigators with an array of criminal justice experience. This division reviews all reports of fraud, waste or abuse received by our office and conducts investigations and management reviews involving elected and appointed officials, employees, agencies, instrumentalities, contractors, their sub-contractors and lower tier sub-contractors and other parities doing business with and/or receiving funds from a LGEA.
What is LGEA?
LGEA is an acronym for all Local Governmental Entities Authorized by Ordinance, Charter, County Code or interlocal agreements to fall within the OIG’s jurisdiction. The OIG’s initial jurisdiction was County government pursuant to Board of County Commissioner adopted Ordinance 2009-049. On November 1, 2010 an interlocal agreement was approved to expand jurisdiction over the Solid Waste Authority. In the November 2010 election voters approved OIG jurisdiction over all thirty-eight municipalities, effective June 1, 2011. On January 1, 2012 the Palm Beach County Health Care District and Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County voluntarily entered into agreement for provision of OIG services.
What kinds of reports of fraud, waste or abuse are investigated?
Examples of the types of reports that are reviewed or investigated include:
Potential Criminal violations
Violations of directives, policies, general orders or procedures
Reports of misconduct, mismanagement, waste, or abuse
Whistle-blower complaints
Do you investigate anonymous reports of fraud, waste or abuse?
Yes, all reports of fraud, waste or abuse are reviewed and may be investigated. Anonymous reports are reviewed to determine whether there is a sufficient, factual basis to reasonably suspect that an administrative or criminal violation involving an employee or contractor doing business with a LGEA may have occurred. The difficulty in investigating an anonymous report is we are limited to the information provided without the ability to obtain specific details of the report.
Do you investigate all reports of fraud, waste or abuse involving government employees?
No. Depending on the information provided, some lesser possible violations are referred to the LGEA management for handling. Additionally, other than the Whistleblower, some reports of fraud, waste or abuse may be referred to senior management as an inquiry requiring a response back to the OIG. Generally, allegations that may result in a suspension, demotion or dismissal or that involve possible criminal violations are handled by the OIG Investigations Division.
How do I know if my report of fraud, waste or abuse will be investigated?
Persons who report fraud, waste or abuse will be notified in writing of whether their report was forwarded to management for handling or as an inquiry requiring a response back to the OIG. They will also receive a copy of management's response to their allegations which are sent as a management inquiry. They will be contacted by the assigned investigator for follow-up on specific knowledge, information, and evidence to what is being alleged.
As an employee, how do I know if I am under investigation?
Prior to any questioning, employees who are the subject of an OIG investigation are notified of such unless the notification is precluded by law or the nature of the allegation warrants a delay.
As a witness, what should I expect when I am called by an OIG investigator?
OIG investigators are notary publics and have the authority to administer oaths. You will be asked by the investigator to take an oath to provide the truth. You will have the option to provide a voluntary statement. Your interview may also be audio recorded.
If I am under investigation, what are my rights? Do I need a representative?
If your class code (position) is covered by a collective bargaining unit, you are urged to review your collective bargaining contract or contact a qualified advisor or representative before being interviewed to ensure that you are familiar with your rights and responsibilities during this investigation. Your collective bargaining contract will explain your rights about representation during the interview process. Representatives may act only as observers and are not entitled to speak for you, or inhibit your responses.
Describe who responds to the findings in an investigative report.
Subjects and entities affected by an investigative finding, pursuant to Article XII, Division 2-427 Palm Beach County Code, are provided an opportunity to respond. The final report includes the response received from the subject or the entity substantially affected. Exceptions to this requirement for subject or affected entity response are criminal and whistle-blower investigations.
How do I report fraud, waste or abuse relating to a government or contract employee?
You may report this information to us in one of four ways; 1) You may report your concerns to us by email, US Mail, or fax in a written complaint; 2) You can stop by our office and meet with an OIG Intake Specialist and provide the information directly to us; 3) You may call our hotline at 877-283-7068; or 4) You can access our secure email (inspector@pbcgov.org) via this website to provide us with the information. In any event, you may remain anonymous; however, you are encouraged to identify yourself so that we may follow up on your call or email and obtain additional information that would help us in an our investigation. Below is a link to the division's reporting form, which is recommended but not required.

Forms to report fraud, waste or abuse: http://www.pbcgov.com/OIG/complaints.htm or
Email a report of fraud, waste or abuse to inspector@pbcgov.org or
Fax a report of fraud, waste or abuse to: (561) 233-2375 or
Mail report to:
Office of Inspector General
Investigations Division
P.O. Box 16568
West Palm Beach, FL 33416

To speak with an Investigator or the Intake Manager in the OIG Investigations Division please call, (561) 233-2350.
Our office is located at:
Office of Inspector General
Airport Center
100 Australian Avenue, 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33406



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